Saturn’s Moons Dance Around Each Other

In orbit around Saturn, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured this image of Saturn’s moon Tethys with its prominent Odysseus Crater slipping behind Saturn’s largest moon Titan. Tethys (1,062 km, or 660 mi across) is more than twice as far from Cassini than Titan (5,150 km, or 3,200 mi across). Tethys is 2.2 million km (1.4 million mi) from Cassini, where Titan is only about 1 million km (621,000 mi) away. This image was obtained with the a narrow-angle camera on November 26, 2009. Image scale is 6 km (4 mi) per pixel on Titan and 13 km (8 mi) per pixel on Tethys. (NASA/JPL/SSI)
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